A new Discussion Forum

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A new Discussion Forum

Edwin Macadam (wg-admin)
Administrator
Well, the old Forum disappeared in a puff of smoke, having served a useful purpose for many years. Taken over by people who say they will reinstate it in its original form, but probably have no intention to do so because it costs too much.

This new Forum is an attempt to provide something similar for both WGMA members and anyone else who seeks to find out what West Gallery music is all about. This includes not only church and chapel music, but anything during the years 1700 to 1860 which might have influenced it.

You are invited not only to use this Forum, but to help improve its design and performance!
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Re: A new Discussion Forum

Tony Singleton
Well done, Edwin.
It's good to have this Forum back again.
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Re: A new Discussion Forum

Ros Clements
In reply to this post by Edwin Macadam (wg-admin)
Thanks for getting this back in action - let's hope it gets used again
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Re: A new Discussion Forum

Edwin Macadam
Thanks Ros for signing up. There are still a lot of unknown 'workings' behind the admin of this site. The message received by me, ie the copy of your message sent by email, contained a link to this page, to which I am replying, hence this posting.  
I shall also answer the email directly to see if it does what it says in the introductory on-line blurb, and also in the email, ie also post a message on the message board, and where it goes.
What I have not done is to sign in first, which I suspect may make some difference. We need to experiment! -  E
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Re: A new Discussion Forum

Edwin Macadam (wg-admin)
Administrator
In reply to this post by Ros Clements
Hi Ros, again!
This message is in direct response to the email I have received which
invites me directly to respond by email, and that this message will be
added to the discussion.
I still have not registered my name, other than as 'Admin'.
So, here goes!
Edwin M


On 25/01/2020 08:50, Ros Clements [via West Gallery Music Association]
wrote:
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Re: A new Discussion Forum

Chris Turner
In reply to this post by Edwin Macadam (wg-admin)
I have access to a copy of William Matthew's collection,'The Cherub' (in a Nottingham library). On face value it seems much like other collections of hymnody and psalmody from the early 19th century, but what makes it stand out (I hope!) are the 175 names on the subscribers list that reads like a veritable ‘who’s who’ of late-Georgian folk in the East Midlands! I'm interested in how late-Georgian patronage of sacred music was organised.

So far I've researched the following archives:

Nottinghamshire Archives
Derbyshire Archives
British Library

(with planned visits to Bodleian Library and Chatsworth Archives)

I’ve sorted the 175 subscribers into  6 categories that includes:

·         12 Aristocrats/Enobled persons - inluding Duke of Devonshire (Chatsworth House)
·         Industrialists/Bankers/Businessmen e.g. The Smith family of Smiths Bank (big connection to Bromley House!)
          Clerics
·         Musicians/Music sellers/Organists/Choirmasters e.g. The well-known soprano, Eliza Salmon who sang at Covent Garden.
          6  M.P.s and the wives of 3 others (feels like a remarkable number?)
          Local dignitaries/Lord Mayors/High Sheriffs/Magistrates

 (14% of these are Georgian women which I think follows the trend of the time).

What baffles me is how William Matthews, gained access (via Dowager Countess Anne Manvers) to such a tightly connected network of influential people? Names that leapt up from the list include, for instance, ‘R. Arkwright, Cromford’ – Richard Arkwright recorded the richest man in England at the time.

What I’m missing is the inter-connectivity between the Cherub subscribers? – what were they reading? how might The Cherub have been advertised? could it be a social periodical or church magazine? Was there such a thing as Georgian patronage trusts? The list definitely has a ‘seen to be seen’ feel about it – social standing, power and influence (at a time when Nottingham was undergoing one of it’s most turbulent times – the Luddite Rebellion). The price of The Cherub also adds to a sense that this publication was a real statement of exclusivity - £1.00 in c.1820 ? (date of Cherub still to be confirmed but is narrowed down to 1811-1823). Price of £1.00 is the highest for a collection I've seen so far (and I've seen a few by now - bet you have too!).

I’ve spent time researching the publishers – Goulding D’Almaine Potter & Co. and I’m beginning to get a feel about how music was printed and sold at this time. Have had a look at a number of Goulding accumulative catalogues in the BL’s Hirsch collection but no luck in spotting The Cherub.


I've had no luck looking for the Cherub in the Bodleian or the British Library. The British Library only has a copy of the single-sheet reprint of 'Edwinstowe'  dated 'circa 1825 (?) price 'One Penny' (words by the Revd Mr Mason). Will try again later this month!

Hoping to get 'The Cherub' digitised at some point this year. Also copies of Matthews anthems 'Zion', 'Resurrection', and 'Wedding Anthem'.

I would appreciate any advice or information that would further my research (for the Open University).

Thanks,

Chris Turner